Thank you for being part of the 2023 NRBS Annual International Conference. Here you can check all the details of this past event.

2024 event coming soon. Stay tuned.

48th Annual International Conference

Virtual Event with Local Small-In Person “watch parties”

Back to Basics: Getting the most out of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback

October 27th & 28th, 2023

DO NOT MISS THE NRBS 2023 CONFERENCE SILENT AUCTION – Many offerings to enhance your education and/or practice.

Click here for the complete auction list.

Description

       The NRBS Annual Conference 2023 will be held virtually, allowing participants worldwide to join us from the comfort of their homes or workplaces.

October 27, 2023 Participate in person (or virtually)

Join a In Person WATCH PARTY     4:00 – 6:30 PM ET                                Call 610-933-9440 or email [email protected]            RSVP Required

Small-group “watch parties” have been organized in the following locations, allowing attendees to foster local connections, engage in meaningful discussions and enjoy refreshments before and following a joint viewing of the keynote presentation.

                                       Select a location close to you:                                        Plantation, Florida                                      Newton, MA                                    Valley Forge, Pennsylvania                Fabius, New York                    Kingston, New York                                     Wickenburg, Arizona

October 28, 2023

Continue to enjoy the conference virtually from 8 am ET – 5:15 pm ET.

Back to Basics: Optimizing Physiological and Brain Functions

At the NRBS Annual Conference 2023, we will delve into the fundamental principles of biofeedback and neurofeedback, highlighting their applicability in a post-COVID world that requires a comprehensive approach. Explore “top-down, bottom-up” strategies that integrate psychological and physiological interventions to foster personal growth, mental health, and overall well-being and how getting back to basics can build resilience and provide valuable insights for optimizing physiological and brain functions in our daily lives.

 

Embracing Neurodiversity: Unique Needs, Strengths, and Weaknesses.

In today’s world, neurodiversity is a common term that emphasizes our unique needs, strengths, and weaknesses. This conference will address how we can harness the power of biofeedback and neurofeedback to support individuals with diverse neurological profiles and optimize their overall well-being.

Networking and Community Building

NRBS 2023 offers networking opportunities, allowing attendees to connect with like-minded individuals and build meaningful professional relationships. Engage in discussions, exchange ideas, and explore collaborations with colleagues who share your passion for advancing the field of biofeedback.

9 CE Credits (APA and BCIA if attended in its entirety. Must attend live) – $35

Co-Sponsored by AAPB

Speakers

Ed Hamlin, PhD

Saul Rosenthal

Saul Rosenthal, PhD

Dr. Linda Walker, PhD, LPC

Ronald J. Swatzyna, PhD

Richard Harvey, PhD

Anna Wexler, PhD

Mitchell Sadar, PhD

Friday 27th, 2023

Keynote with Ed Hamlin, PhD 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm ET. Attend a local “watch party” or virtually in the comfort of your home/office.

4:30pm – 6:00pm

Déjà Vu All Over Again: Neurofeedback – Past, Present, and Future

SATURDAY 28th, 2023

Virtual Conference presentations 8am-5pm ET

8:00am – 8:15am

Welcome

8:15am – 9:45am

Biofeedback Basics: Learning Your Way to Health

9:45 – 11:15           

Basic tenets for helping the client make the most of Neurofeedback.  How do I know they’re getting it?!

11:15am – 11:30am

Break

11:30am – 1:00pm

The Efficacy of Psychotherapies and Pharmacotherapies for Mental Disorders in Adults

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Lunch & Learn – Explore products and services in sponsor break out rooms

2:00pm – 3:30pm

How good are the new tools: Off-the-shelf wearables in biofeedback practice.

3:30pm – 3:45pm

Break

3:45pm – 5:15pm

Exploring the Ethics of Neurofeedback: Navigating Challenges and Advancing Responsible Applications

Friday 27th, 2023

4:30pm – 6:00pm

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Déjà Vu All Over Again: Neurofeedback – Past, Present, and Future

1.5 CE credits (APA and BCIA)

Neurofeedback developed as a specialized form of biofeedback in the 1960s largely based on the pioneering work of Joe Kamiya and Barry Sterman beginning first in academic laboratories but quickly expanding into clinical settings. For many years neurofeedback protocols used in practice were very similar to those developed from Kamiya’s work with Alpha brainwaves based on findings from studying meditators and Sterman’s work with Beta/SMR brainwaves based on extensions of his initial clinical work with seizure patients. Soon, based on the work of Elmer and Alyce Green at the Menninger Foundation along with Eugene Peniston’s clinical applications, Alpha/Theta training was added to the earlier approaches. As normative databases of EEG activity developed in the 1970s and 1980s and made widely available in the 1990s, many more approaches for conducting neurofeedback developed and proliferated. Currently, there is a wide variety of foundational theories, equipment, and approaches for conducting neurofeedback that are available for both researchers and clinicians to choose between. Development is on-going and the future almost certainly will involve even further expansion.

However, despite its long history, neurofeedback continues to be a poorly recognized and underutilized modality. Several reasons for these deficiencies are often given, but one that isheard from the scientific community involves a lack of sufficiently definitive research. However, an unparalleled opportunity appears to exist due to a combination of factors. First, there are more widely recognized limitations to the efficacy and the safety of commonly used medications for addressing mental health problems, even though their use among the population continues to rise. More people are seeking treatment for emotional and behavioral disorders than has ever been true in the past as some of the stigma for needing help has thankfully reduced.

However, there is often not enough qualified providers to meet the increased demand in a timely manner. It also has to be acknowledged that despite many gains in the treatment of medical disorders over the past several decades, outcomes from mental health treatment have failed to show the same degree of progress. While deaths from strokes, heart disease, HIV, and some cancers have decreased, death from suicide has increased. Practitioners of neurofeedback are convinced that its implementation has improved their outcomes, but have not produced evidence conclusive enough to get adequate third-party reimbursement or even greater professional or public awareness of the contributions it could make. There is a broad acknowledgement that our society is facing a mental health crisis which would seem to provide an opening for increased awareness of treatment techniques offering improved efficacy.

In this talk we will first review the history of neurofeedback’s implementation in clinical practice along with the early evidence frequently cited in support of its efficacy. We will also examine some of the criticisms of the technique which have hampered broader acceptance, as well as, limiting funding necessary for conducting additional research. From here we will be discussing the current status and practice of neurofeedback progressing to some speculations about its future. We will be exploring patterns seen in existing research that may provide information helpful for obtaining greater recognition and acceptance. We will conclude with some speculation about future developments, including ideas for expanding neurofeedback into underserved populations.

  1. Describe two proposed mechanisms underlying changes seen from neurofeedback training.
  2. Identify the primary finding from the ICAN double-blind study of neurofeedback for ADHD.
  3. List the 3 nonspecific targets of neurofeedback training that can be used to enhance outcomes.

INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area. Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment, or general knowledge. The primary goal of this particular program is to broaden the clinical, consultative, and research knowledge bases of attendees and was deemed intermediate, by the definition above.  For those psychologists using the modality of biofeedback and interested in efficacy, science, and latest clinical applications. This conference presents research relevant to psychological practice, education, and science; (2) it is our intention to host an offering to help psychologists to keep up with the most current scientific evidence regarding assessment, intervention, and education; and (3) we believe that this program would allow psychologists to increase competencies to improve services to patients. This conference is IN NO WAY a substitute for the basic academic education and training needed for entry into the field of psychology. 

 

The presentation content respects and attends to cultural, individual and role differences, specifically related to Topic of presentation within Specific populations as evidenced by the title, program description, learning objectives and references.  

The program will address How can neurofeedback providers and organizations promote broader availability for marginalized and underserved populations who may be having an even greater impact from the current stressors facing humanity?

by Ed Hamlin, PhD

Saturday 28th, 2023

8:15am – 9:45am

Lecture 1

Biofeedback Basics: Learning Your Way to Health

1.5 CE credits (APA and BCIA)

Biopsychosocial or integrated models of health are now commonly accepted as the best way to guide our understanding and improvement of health. Biofeedback is a treatment approach that integrates biological, cognitive and behavioral aspects of the individual’s experience, and can be presented in ways that optimally integrate a diverse range of health, personality, and cultural factors. It is used both adjunctively and as primary treatment for a variety of physical and mental health conditions. The purpose of this talk is to describe biofeedback and the role it can play in improving health. The talk presents biofeedback’s model of treatment, evidence supporting efficacy, and practical matters for implementation.
  1. Define and understand the difference between positive and negative feedback loops
  2. Describe the five most common biofeedback modalities
  3. Identify the primary professional resources for training, certification, and continuing education.

INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area. Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment, or general knowledge. The primary goal of this particular program is to broaden the clinical, consultative, and research knowledge bases of attendees and was deemed intermediate, by the definition above.  For those psychologists using the modality of biofeedback and interested in efficacy, science, and latest clinical applications. This conference presents research relevant to psychological practice, education, and science; (2) it is our intention to host an offering to help psychologists to keep up with the most current scientific evidence regarding assessment, intervention, and education; and (3) we believe that this program would allow psychologists to increase competencies to improve services to patients. This conference is IN NO WAY a substitute for the basic academic education and training needed for entry into the field of psychology. 

The presentation content respects and attends to cultural, individual and role differences, specifically related to the ethics of neurofeedback within the general public and neurofeedback providers as evidenced by the title, program description, learning objectives and references.  When there are specific ethical issues related to cultural diversity, this will be addressed in the form of how such considerations are taken into account in research,in the instructional materials presented to professionals, and how professionals must take this into account to practice in an ethically appropriate

by Saul Rosenthal, PhD

9:45am – 11:15am

Lecture 2

Basic tenets for helping the client make the most of Neurofeedback.
How do I know they’re getting it?!

1.5 CE credits (APA and BCIA)

Helping clients be successful at neurofeedback therapy necessarily starts with getting the right protocols, but maximizing benefit doesn’t stop there. In session, stepping beyond the movie and the automatic threshold to understand how the client learns, gains a skill and integrates the feedback allows clinicians to provide an extra layer of therapeutic support. This workshop helps clinicians learn to use thresholds, filters and feedback exercises to maximize learning and skill acquisition.

  1. Describe how setting thresholds facilitates learning of the client.
  2. Summarize one method of using video-based feedback to enhance trainee learning.
  3. Name one objective outcome assessment that can help in the evaluation of neurofeedback progress.

INTERMEDIATE: Content builds upon the learner’s foundational knowledge, familiarity with the literature and/or experience in a content area. Programming at this level includes more depth than at a beginning level program. It could also serve as a refresher course for individuals who have a background in a content area and are interested in learning more contemporary applications. The primary goal of this particular program is to broaden the clinical, consultative, and research knowledge bases of attendees and was deemed intermediate, by the definition above.  For those psychologists using the modality of biofeedback and interested in efficacy, science, and latest clinical applications. This conference presents research relevant to psychological practice, education, and science; (2) it is our intention to host an offering to help psychologists to keep up with the most current scientific evidence regarding assessment, intervention, and education; and (3) we believe that this program would allow psychologists to increase competencies to improve services to patients. This conference is IN NO WAY a substitute for the basic academic education and training needed for entry into the field of psychology.

 

The topic applies to all populations and is sensitive to racial, cultural and gender differences; the clinician is invited to explore how the individual learns and is best able to integrate neurofeedback therapy into personal experience. This evaluation includes – but also transcends – racial, cultural and gender differences.

by Dr. Linda Walker, PhD, LPC

11:30am – 1:00pm

Lecture 3

The Efficacy of Psychotherapies and Pharmacotherapies for Mental Disorders in Adults

1.5 CE credits (APA and BCIA)

Mental disorders represent a worldwide public health concern. Psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies are recommended as first line treatments.However, evidence has emerged that their efficacy may be overestimated, due to a variety of shortcomings in clinical trials (e.g., publication bias,weak control conditions such as waiting list). We performed an umbrella review of recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies for the main mental disorders in adults. We selected meta-analyses that formally assessed risk of bias or quality of studies, excluded weak comparators, and used effect sizes for target symptoms as primary outcome. We searched PubMed and PsycINFO and individual records of the Cochrane Library for meta-analyses published between January 2014 and March 2021 comparing psychotherapies or pharmacotherapies with placebo or treatment-as-usual (TAU), or psychotherapies vs. pharmacotherapies head-to-head, or the combination of psychotherapy with pharmacotherapy to either monotherapy. One hundred and two meta-analyses, encompassing 3,782 RCTs and 650,514 patients, were included, covering depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, somato-form disorders, eating disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, substance use disorders, insomnia, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and bipolar disorder. Across disorders and treatments, the majority of effect sizes for target symptoms were small. A random effect meta-analytic evaluation of the effect sizes reported by the largest meta-analyses per disorder yielded a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.34 (95% CI: 0.26-0.42) for psychotherapies and 0.36 (95% CI: 0.32-0.41) for pharmacotherapies compared with placebo or TAU. The SMD for head-to-head comparisons of psychotherapies vs. pharmacotherapies was 0.11 (95% CI: –0.05 to 0.26). The SMD for the combined treatment compared with either monotherapy was 0.31 (95% CI: 0.19-0.44). Risk of bias was often high. After more than half a century of research, thousands of RCTs and millions of invested funds, the effect sizes of psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies for mental disorders are limited, suggesting a ceiling effect for treatment research as presently conducted. A paradigm shift in research seems to be required to achieve further progress.

 

 

List 3 possible limitations of pharmaceutical research

 

Compare the different effect sizes of psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies in relationship to placebo as evidenced in the current study

 

Describe a paradigm shift that can be applied in regards to improving available mental health treatments/interventions.

INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area. Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment, or general knowledge. The primary goal of this particular program is to broaden the clinical, consultative, and research knowledge bases of attendees and was deemed intermediate, by the definition above.  For those psychologists using the modality of biofeedback and interested in efficacy, science, and latest clinical applications. This conference presents research relevant to psychological practice, education, and science; (2) it is our intention to host an offering to help psychologists to keep up with the most current scientific evidence regarding assessment, intervention, and education; and (3) we believe that this program would allow psychologists to increase competencies to improve services to patients. This conference is IN NO WAY a substitute for the basic academic education and training needed for entry into the field of psychology.

 

The topic applies to all populations and is sensitive to racial, cultural and gender differences; the clinician is invited to explore how the individual learns and is best able to integrate neurofeedback therapy into personal experience. This presentation includes – but also transcends – racial, cultural and gender differences.

by Ronald J. Swatzyna, PhD

2:00pm – 3:30pm

Lecture 4

How good are the new tools:
Off-the-shelf wearables in biofeedback practice.

1.5 CE credits (APA and BCIA)

Wearables are the next new thing. This brief description of devices presents some recent advances in the art and science of portable and wearable instruments useful in biofeedback practice. Learning outcomes include conceptual considerations describing ‘when, where and for whom’ would wearable devices work best, along with a discussion of practical versions of tools, both worn on the body and/or woven into clothing. The overview concludes with some recommendations for the future of biofeedback training approaches that take advantage of portable pieces of technology.
  1. Identify appropriate applications of wearable devices in biofeedback practice
  2. Recognize limitations of technology
  3. Consider client costs and benefits

The presentation content respects and attends to cultural, individual and role differences, specifically related to the ethics of neurofeedback within the general public and neurofeedback providers as evidenced by the title, program description, learning objectives and references.  When there are specific ethical issues related to cultural diversity, this will be addressed in the form of how such considerations are taken into account in research,in the instructional materials presented to professionals, and how professionals must take this into account to practice in an ethically appropriate

by Richard Harvey, PhD

3:45pm – 5:15pm

Lecture 5

Exploring the Ethics of Neurofeedback:
Navigating Challenges and Advancing Responsible Applications

1.5 CE credits (APA and BCIA)

This talk will explore the ethical dimensions of neurofeedback, covering recent conceptual and empirical work from my lab on ethical issues in alternative neurotherapies more generally as well as those specifically related to neurofeedback. Key topics include those related to truthful representation of evidence base, provider competency, vulnerable populations, potential psychological harms, conflicts of interest, and adequate patient understanding. The talk will conclude with practical suggestions for enhancing the ethical provision and responsible application of neurofeedback.
  1. Understand the ethical and legal considerations of providing neurofeedback.
  2. Describe empirical research related to the ethics of neurofeedback.
  3. Identify opportunities for improving the ethical provision of neurofeedback.

INTRODUCTORY: Content is designed for psychologists who may have little to no background in a specialized skill or content area. Through this level of programming, the learner can become acquainted with the theoretical underpinnings, principles, methods, and perspectives of a content area. An introductory level program also may serve as the foundation for subsequent intermediate and advanced learning. Introductory level programming may also be related to an emerging area of knowledge or practice. Although this content can be used as a foundation for more advanced learning, an introductory level program may simply focus on breadth, enrichment, or general knowledge. The primary goal of this particular program is to broaden the clinical, consultative, and research knowledge bases of attendees and was deemed intermediate, by the definition above.  For those psychologists using the modality of biofeedback and interested in efficacy, science, and latest clinical applications. This conference presents research relevant to psychological practice, education, and science; (2) it is our intention to host an offering to help psychologists to keep up with the most current scientific evidence regarding assessment, intervention, and education; and (3) we believe that this program would allow psychologists to increase competencies to improve services to patients. This conference is IN NO WAY a substitute for the basic academic education and training needed for entry into the field of psychology.

 

 

The presentation content respects and attends to cultural, individual and role differences, specifically related to the ethics of neurofeedback within the general public and neurofeedback providers as evidenced by the title, program description, learning objectives and references.  When there are specific ethical issues related to cultural diversity, this will be addressed in the form of how such considerations are taken into account in research,in the instructional materials presented to professionals, and how professionals must take this into account to practice in an ethically appropriate

by Anna Wexler, PhD
and Mitchell Sadar, PhD

Grievance Policy 

The Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) is fully committed to conducting all activities in strict conformance with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists. AAPB will comply with all legal and ethical responsibilities to be non-discriminatory in promotional activities, program content and in the treatment of program participants. The monitoring and assessment of compliance with these standards will be the responsibility of the Education Chair in consultation with the members of the continuing education committee, the AAPB Ethics Chairperson, Continuing Education (CE) Committee Chairperson, Program Planning Committee Chairperson, and/or the Conference Chairperson. While AAPB goes to great lengths to assure fair treatment for all participants and attempts to anticipate problems, there will be occasional issues which come to the attention of the convention staff which require intervention and/or action on the part of the convention staff or an officer of AAPB. This procedural description serves as a guideline for handling such grievances. 1. When a participant, either orally or in written format, files a grievance and expects action on the complaint, the following actions will be taken. If the person toward whom the grievance is directed is also the instructor or a chair of any of the above-mentioned committees, the AAPB Board of Directors will appoint a Board representative to oversee the resolution of any of the participant complaints, in an effort to avoid any and all conflicts of interest. If the grievance concerns a speaker, the content presented by the speaker, or the style of presentation, the individual filing the grievance will be asked to put his/her comments in written format. The CE Chair will then pass on the comments to the speaker, assuring the confidentiality of the grieved individual. 2. If the grievance concerns a workshop offering, its content, level of presentation, or the facilities in which the workshop was offered, the convention chair will mediate and will be the final arbitrator. If the participant requests action, the convention chair will: a) attempt to move the participant to another workshop or b) provide a credit for a subsequent year’s workshop or c) provide a partial or full refund of the workshop fee. Actions 2b and 2c will require a written note, documenting the grievance, for record keeping purposes. The note need not be signed by the grieved individual.  3. If the grievance concerns an AAPB CE program, in a specific regard, the CE Chair will attempt to arbitrate.

Contact name(s)*: Leslie Shivers, AAPB Executive Director
Email: [email protected]
Telephone: 800-477-8892 or +1 303-422-8436
Address: PO Box 461797, Aurora, CO 80046-1797

CANCELLATION POLICY:  Cancellation requests received in the NRBS office by October 15th will be refunded minus a $50 processing fee. NO REFUNDS WILL BE GRANTED AFTER October 16, 2023. Cancellations must be made in writing and emailed to [email protected]. Fees cannot be refunded for registrations cancelled after the conference begins.

 

REGISTER

Non-Member

Regular price: $349

*Registration includes Conference and 1-year Rolling Membership.

Member

Regular price: $250

*Registration includes Conference

Are you already a member? Login to enjoy your membership discount.

NRBS is delighted to unveil our fee schedule for international applicants. Click here for more details

This is a live online event 

Can’t attend live? Recording available for 30 days.

Please contact [email protected] with questions

NRBS Webinar Series 2024 - Complete list

  • April 5th @1-2pm ET: Vigilance and Arousal Related to ADHD/ Presenter: Andreas Mueller, PhD
  • April 24th @12-1pm ET: Havening Techniques for Biofeedback Clinicians/ Presenter: Alexandra Linardakis RN, BCN and Mitchell Sadar, PhD
  • May 2nd @12p-1pm ET: Culturally Conscious and Ethical Connections for BIPOC
  • June 11th @12-1pm ET: Expanding Your Clinical Practice with Biofeedback, Putting the Body into Mind/Body / Presenter: Harry Campbell
  • July 23rd @12-1pm ET: Enhancing Your Practice with Trust-based Relational Intervention (TBRI) / Presenter: Dr. Angeliqueca Avery, EdD, MSW, LPC-S
  • August 21st @12-1pm: Feedback with integrity: Tips for ethical biofeedback and neurofeedback/Presenter: Lynda Thompson
  • September 24 @12-1pm:  Enhancing Cognitive Performance and Emotional Regulation through Cutting-Edge Brain Training Techniques  (ie. Neurofeedback “Cheat Codes”) /Presenter:  Brendan Parsons, M.Sc., Ph.D., BCN
  • October 3rd @12-1pm ET: Privacy and Duty to Warn: The Ethics of AI Applications in The Mental Health Field/ Presenter: Rogene Eichler West

Continuing Education:

A total of 8 CEs for BCIA re-certification are offered for those who attend live or virtually (test must be completed for virtual attendees). You must attend ALL 8 webinars to receive CEs. Partial credit will not be offered.

APA CE credits are being applied for.
In addition, all attendees who desire CEs must complete a program evaluation for each webinar.

Course fees and refund/cancellation policy:

NRBS Members for the entire series (includes CEs) - $150

Non-Members for the entire series (includes CEs) - $329

NRBS Members for each individually purchased webinar (CEs not available for individual purchase) - $30

Non-Members for each individually purchased webinar (CEs not available for individual purchase) - $45

Refund policy: For individual programs, refunds will be issued up to 1 week prior to the event. For the full series, refunds will be issued within 2 weeks following purchase as long as none of the recordings has been accessed or the person requesting the refund has not attended a live session. All refunds will be assessed a $30 processing fee.

Target Audience:

Psychologists, mental health professionals, health care practitioners, and other interested clinicians as well as students in these fields.

This program, when attended in its entirety, is available for 8 continuing education credits.

Accreditation Statement

APA Approved Sponsor Logo

Arizona Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Arizona Psychological Association maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The views of the presenters are theirs and do not necessarily represent a position by Arizona Psychological Association. Arizona Psychological Association is committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in its continuing education activities. Arizona Psychological Association is also committed to conducting all activities in conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. Please address questions, concerns, and any complaints to Angelika Sadar at 610-933-9440, [email protected]

If participants have special needs, reasonable accommodations will be made for persons who request them, consistent with ADA requirements.

It is the responsibility of every attendee to abide by the standards set forth in the APA Code of Ethics for maintaining security and confidentiality of test materials and proprietary information presented as part of this continuing education program. Any materials used as part of this program may not be copied or otherwise distributed, and no proprietary information will be disclosed by attendees to any person not registered for this program.

There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE Sponsor, presenting organization, speaker(s), program content, research, grants, or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflicts of interest.

NRBS SUPPORTING SPONSORS

Learn more about our supporting sponsors and ways they can help your personal & professional development.

Continuing education Information

CONTINUING EDUCATION

This program is co-sponsored by the Northeast Regional Biofeedback Society and The Institute for Continuing Education. The program offers 5.50 hours on Day One; and 4.50 hrs. on day Two. CE hours awarded are based on actual participation. Full attendance is required for each event in which you participate. The CE processing fee is $35.00 per person and submitted to The Institute for Continuing Education at the time completed CE paperwork is mailed.

Attendees who wish to apply for continuing education credit MUST complete CE forms and comply with attendance monitoring requirements.

NOTE: To receive continuing education credit, applicants must complete all CE forms and comply with attendance monitoring requirements.

NOTE: It is the responsibility of the attendee to determine if CE credit offered by The Institute for Continuing Education and/or The American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children, meets the regulations of their state licensing/certification board.

Questions: If you have questions regarding continuing education, the program, faculty, learning objectives per event, grievance issues, faculty, please contact The Institute at: 800-557-1950; e-mail: [email protected].

Commercial Support: The Institute for Continuing Education receives no funds from any commercial organization for financial support of its activities in providing continuing education sponsorship of this event.

Psychology: The Institute for Continuing Education is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Institute for Continuing Education maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
New York: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0043.

Counseling: For counselors seeking credit, The Institute for Continuing Education will submit a co-sponsorship application to NBCC.
New York: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors. Provider MHC-0016.
Ohio Board Counseling/ Social Work: Ohio Board of Counseling and Social Work Board, Provider RCS 030001.

Social Work: Application for social work continuing education credits has been submitted. This website will be updated regarding approval.
New York: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers. Provider No. SW-0025.
Ohio: Counseling and Social Work Board, Provider RCS 030001.
Florida Dept. Health, Division Social Work, MFT, Counseling, Provider BAP 255, expiration 03/2023.
Illinois Dept. Professional Regulation: The Institute is recognized as a provider of continuing education by the Illinois Dept. of Professional Regulation, Social Work
Division, Provider 159.000606.
New Jersey: this program has NOT been submitted for pre-approval to the New Jersey Board of Social Work.

Marriage/Family Therapy:
New York: The Institute for Continuing Education is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage/family therapists, Provider MHC-0012.
Florida: The Institute for Continuing Education is a recognized provider of continuing education by the Florida Department of Health, Division of Marriage and Family Therapist, BAP 255, expiration 03/2023
California Professionals: The Institute for Continuing Education, Provider 56590, is approved by the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists to sponsor continuing education for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCCs. The Institute for Continuing Education maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This Course meets the qualifications for continuing education credit for LMFTs, LCSWs, LPCC, as required by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.
Illinois Department MFT: Provider 168-000108.